Haiti ‘Ransom’ Project

Highlights

  1. Photo
    An illustration depicting plantations burning in 1791, during the Haitian Revolution.
    CreditUniversal Images Group, via Getty Images

    The Root of Haiti’s Misery: Reparations to Enslavers

    In 1791, enslaved Haitians ousted the French and founded a nation. But France made generations of Haitians pay for their freedom. How much it cost them was a mystery, until now.

    By Catherine PorterConstant MéheutMatt Apuzzo and

    1. Photo
      CreditDamon Winter/The New York Times

      Haiti’s Lost Billions

      The staggering sum Haiti paid for its independence cemented its path to poverty.

      By Lazaro GamioConstant MéheutCatherine PorterSelam GebrekidanAllison McCann and

    2. Photo
      CreditMauricio Lima for The New York Times

      How a French Bank Captured Haiti

      It helped finance the Eiffel Tower as it drained millions from Haiti. The bank, C.I.C., won’t talk about it, but The Times tracked how much its investors made — and what Haiti lost.

      By Matt ApuzzoConstant MéheutSelam Gebrekidan and

    3. Photo
      CreditGetty Images

      Invade Haiti, Wall Street Urged. The U.S. Obliged.

      The long occupation of Haiti began with a drumbeat from the bank that became Citigroup, decades of diplomatic correspondence and other records show.

      By Selam GebrekidanMatt ApuzzoCatherine Porter and

  1. Photo
    CreditLynsey Addario for The New York Times

    Demanding Reparations, and Ending Up in Exile

    A firebrand Haitian president tried to hold France to account for its years of exploitation. He soon found himself ousted from power.

    By Constant MéheutCatherine PorterSelam Gebrekidan and

  2. The Ransom

    Photo
    Cannonballs at the Citadelle, largest military fortress in the Caribbean, stacked to defend against a feared French invasion.
    CreditFederico Rios for The New York Times

    6 Takeaways About Haiti’s Reparations to France

    How did the modern world’s most successful slave revolt give birth to a desperately poor nation? Here is a summary of what a team of New York Times correspondents found out.

    By

  3. Photo
    CreditFederico Rios for The New York Times

    The Ransom: A Look Under the Hood

    Thousands of pages of original documents, and hundreds of books and articles. Here are the historians and researchers on which the Haiti project drew.

    By Catherine PorterConstant MéheutSelam Gebrekidan and

  4. Photo
    CreditFederico Rios pour The New York Times

    Plongée dans la Double Dette d’Haïti

    Des journalistes du New York Times ont calculé le montant que les Haïtiens ont payé à la France en contrpartie de leur liberté, et comment Haïti s’en trouve toujours impacté.

    By

  1. Photo
    A mural of Jean-Bertrand Aristide, the former president of Haiti.
    CreditChang W. Lee/The New York Times

    Li mande reparasyon, yo ba li egzil

    Yon prezidan Ayisyen popilis eseye fè regleman ak Lafrans pou tout tan Lafrans t ap esplwate Ayti. Yon ti tan apre yo mete l atè sou pouvwa a.

    By Constant MéheutCatherine PorterSelam Gebrekidan and

  2. Photo
    Pari pandan Belle Époque la, yon peryòd pwosperite pou Lafrans nan fen 19yèm syèk ak kòmansman 20yèm syèk. 
    CreditGetty Images

    Men ki jan yon bank fransè pran Ayiti

    Pandan bank yo rele C.I.C. a t ap ede finanse Tou Efèl la, li t ap pran plizyè milyon dola ann Ayiti. Bank lan refize pale de sa, men jounal Times chèche konnen konbyen kòb envestisè yo te fè kòm pwofi, epi ki sa Ayiti pèdi.

    By Matt ApuzzoConstant MéheutSelam Gebrekidan and

  3. Photo
    Adrienne Present ap prepare kafe byen bonè nan maten lakay li Dondon, Ayiti.
    CreditFederico Rios pou The New York Times

    Rasin mizè Ayiti: Reparasyon yo bay Mèt esklav yo

    An 1791, Ayisyen ki te an esklavaj yo kouri dèyè Fransè yo epi fonde yon nasyon. Men Lafrans fè plizyè jenerasyon Ayisyen peye pou libète yo. Konbyen sa te koute yo te yon mistè, jouk koulyeya.

    By Catherine PorterConstant MéheutMatt Apuzzo and