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The Book Review Turns 125

As we celebrate our 125th anniversary, join us on a trip through the archives to see some of our spectacular reviews, interviews and essays.

As we celebrate our 125th anniversary, join us on a trip through the archives to see some of our spectacular reviews, interviews and essays.

Highlights

  1. Photo
    CreditLily Snowden-Fine

    from the book review archives

    Review: ‘O Pioneers!’ by Willa Cather

    In 1913, The Times declared Cather’s “novel without a hero” to be “American in the best sense of the word.”

    1. Photo
      CreditDiana Ejaita

      from the book review archives

      Review: ‘White Teeth,’ by Zadie Smith

      A satirical, multigenerational family saga set during the waning of the colonial British Empire, this 2000 debut established its author as a prodigy of the novel form.

    2. Photo
      CreditSeymour Chwast

      from the book review archives

      Interview: Gore Vidal

      Diane Johnson chatted with the confident writer in 1977, asking him to explain what made him a self-proclaimed “authority” on all things literary.

      By

    3. Photo
      CreditPetra Börner

      from the book review archives

      Review: ‘Wolf Hall,’ by Hilary Mantel

      This fictional portrait of Henry VIII’s scheming aide Thomas Cromwell — the first volume in a trilogy — won the Man Booker Prize in 2009.

      By

  1. From the Book Review Archives

    Photo
    CreditPhotograph by Chuck Close, illustration by Jon Key

    Interview: Colson Whitehead

    “I am working in the African American literary tradition,” the novelist told us in 2001. “That’s my aim and what I see as my mission.”

  2. From the Book Review Archives

    Photo
    CreditEleni Kalorkoti

    Review: ‘Eat, Pray, Love,’ by Elizabeth Gilbert

    Reeling from a divorce, a writer sought solace in Italy, India and Indonesia. There, she found peace — and plenty of material for a blockbuster memoir.

    By

  3. from the book review archives

    Photo
    CreditIllustrations by Ross MacDonald

    Classic Crime Novels That Still Thrill Today

    Here’s how we reviewed now-famous mysteries by the likes of Agatha Christie, Ngaio Marsh, Dorothy Sayers, Dashiell Hammett and more.

  1. from the book review archives

    Photo
    CreditNa Kim

    Review: ‘The Liars’ Club,’ by Mary Karr

    The Times would later call this 1995 memoir of a hardscrabble Texas childhood “one of the best books ever written about growing up in America.”

  2. from the book review archives

    Photo
    CreditKatty Huertas

    Interview: Isabel Allende

    The Chilean novelist was living in exile when her first novel was published in 1985. “In a way, I feel that I am working for my country, even if I don’t live there,” she told us.