Our Best Easter Recipes

Here’s what to cook when you’ve had your fill of chocolate bunnies.

Nigella Lawson’s Easter egg nest cake.
Credit...Jim Wilson/The New York Times

One cannot live on jelly beans alone. Here are our best Easter recipes, including holiday ham and ways to use all of those leftover hard-boiled eggs.

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Credit...Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times

Martha Rose Shulman’s roasted carrots are a simple, colorful side dish for the Easter table. To make it, just toss peeled carrots with olive oil, salt, pepper, thyme and oregano, roast everything until tender, then stir in chopped fresh parsley for a little springy color.

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Credit...Sang An for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Simon Andrews. Prop Stylist: Paige Hicks.

Make this recipe for pizza rustica, or Easter pie, from Carlo’s Bakery of “Cake Boss” fame. It’s loaded with prosciutto, pepperoni, soppressata, mozzarella and provolone, so you won’t be hungry until Monday night.

Recipe: Pizza Rustica (Easter Pie)

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Credit...Andrew Purcell for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Carrie Purcell.

It’s asparagus season, and Melissa Clark’s recipe is a straightforward though flavorful way to prepare it. Pair spears and leeks with capers and olive oil, then roast until crisp-edged and serve with a caper-dotted mustard sauce.

Recipe: Roasted Asparagus With Crispy Leeks and Capers

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Julia Moskin’s recipe is the only one you’ll ever need for roast lamb. The gist is this: Coat your lamb roast with plenty of butter, anchovies (or mustard), fresh rosemary and garlic, then roast until done. Serve with potatoes of some sort and snappy spring vegetables.

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For a vegetarian main dish, try Kay Chun’s baked risotto with greens and peas. That it’s baked means there’s none of that constant stirring typical of most risotto recipes.

Recipe: Baked Risotto With Greens and Peas

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Credit...Julia Gartland for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Michelle Gatton.

This simple but impressive gratin from Mark Bittman is a classic, no-fail potato side dish. If you’d like, play with sprinkling fresh herbs between the slices.

Recipe: Potatoes au Gratin

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Hetty McKinnon is a vegetable magician. Case in point: This warm roasted salad of carrots, barley and arugula tossed with a spiced tahini dressing is beautiful enough to stand on its own or as a side dish to roast lamb or chicken.

Recipe: Warm Roasted Carrot and Barley Salad

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Credit...Bobbi Lin for The New York Times. Food Stylist :Monica Pierini.

Genevieve Ko created the perfect hot cross bun: not too sweet, light and fluffy, and studded with plump raisins and candied orange peel. Eat them hot, and, maybe it’s not traditional, but torn open and slathered with butter.

Recipe: Hot Cross Buns

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For the ideal version of carrot cake, look no further than Dorie Greenspan. Her recipe yields a tender, moist cake frosted with a tangy cream cheese icing.

Recipe: Carrot Cake

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Once the eggs are dyed, hidden, then found, enlist the kids to peel them so you can throw together a platter of deviled eggs. This recipe, which is adapted from “U.S.A. Cookbook,” by Sheila Lukins, has more than 2,400 five-star ratings, so you’ll be in good company.

Recipe: Deviled Eggs

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Credit...Bobbi Lin for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Monica Pierini.

From Genevieve Ko comes a smart technique for guaranteeing a not-dry-at-all, salty-sweet baked ham: Buy a presliced ham, let it warm over a simmering mixture of wine, juniper berries, peppercorns, cloves and honey, then slather it with a mixture of brown sugar, mustard and honey, and let it cook in the oven until the edges are crackling and caramelized.

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Credit...David Malosh for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Simon Andrews.

Keep dessert simple with this homey rhubarb crumble from Melissa Clark. Just mix together rhubarb (toss in some apple or raspberries, if you’re feeling it) with a little sugar and flour, then top with a combination of flour, butter, sugar, baking powder, spices and pistachios. Bake until the juices bubble and peek through.

Recipe: Rhubarb Crumble

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Credit...Christopher Simpson for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Barrett Washburne.

Like a spring garden party on a plate, Ali Slagle’s ginger-dill salmon with citrus and avocado is a happy meeting of colors, flavors and textures. Add baby greens, thinly sliced cucumbers or fennel, roasted beets, soba noodles, tostadas, furikake or chile oil.

Recipe: Ginger-Dill Salmon

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Creamy and tart, sweet and light, this lemon meringue pie from Alice Waters is everything you want in a warm-weather dessert. Alice calls for Meyer lemons, but if you can’t find them, regular lemons will work just fine.

Recipe: Lemon Meringue Pie

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Credit...Andrew Scrivani for The New York Times

Melissa Clark’s pork roast has all of the best characteristics of Italian porchetta — a rich, crackling crust and intense garlic, lemon and herb flavors — but it’s far less work. This recipe feeds many, so wrap up leftovers for guests to take home or for sandwiches the next day.

Recipe: Porchetta Pork Roast

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Credit...Jim Wilson/The New York Times

This dessert from Nigella Lawson gets an A-plus for cuteness, but its lighthearted exterior belies the sophisticated textures beneath: fudginess from a flourless chocolate cake and airiness from a whipped cream mousse.

Recipe: Easter Egg Nest Cake

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Credit...Ryan Liebe for The New York Times. Food Stylist: Simon Andrews.

Make this gorgeous, asparagus-goat cheese tart from Melissa Clark, as a vegetarian main dish for Easter brunch or as a side dish for dinner. Substitute sour cream for the crème fraîche, and standard supermarket puff pastry for the all-butter sort if you need to. It’ll still be spectacular.

Recipe: Asparagus Tart

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Credit...Craig Lee for The New York Times

Delight everyone at the table with individual ramekins of Mark Bittman’s crème brûlée. With just five ingredients — heavy cream, vanilla, salt, eggs and sugar — it comes together quickly and without a lot of fuss. If you don’t have a culinary blowtorch to crisp the top, the broiler of your oven will work just as well.